Car Shopping and New Driver Insurance Tips

Broken Car Insurance

Broken Car Insurance

I officially only own a car now, one were sold recently. It still seems bizarre, since I passed my theory test, I’m now looking at a car for me to drive. I am juggling between a few ideas…

Update: I now own 2 cars again, Just bought another Car.

Short Term Plan

Buy an older car, perhaps a 2004-2007 plate, keep it for a year rack up the no claim bonus and experience. This will be a smaller car, and not as useful to lump my gym weights, kegs, logs and other stuff around. Once the year is up, I’ll have a year under my belt which reduces my insurance by approx 8%, the no claims discount will take approx 20% off, nearly cutting a third off my insurance.

I can then buy a more suitable car with the reduced insurance.

Medium Term Plan

Buy an decentish car, perhaps a 2008-2011 plate, keep it for 2-3 yr, rack up multiple no claims and years of experience.  This will be a larger more practical car, able to move all that I need to move but not quite my ideal car.

By the my current estimates 3 yrs experience knocks approx 12% off the insurance and 3 yrs no claims knocks 35% off. These aren’t applied concurrently, so its not like £1000-47%=£530, its more like £1000-12%-35%=£572.

I at this point, would be able to buy a lower trim/spec ideal car, with affordable insurance.

Long Term Plan

Buy the type of car I want, with a lower trim and slightly older registration to reign in the insurance.

I would need to bite the bullet on the insurance, VED and initial costs, but solves all my problems with the other plans. The numbers make it clear, this is a really really bad idea.

Its likely I will need to do Short Term, Medium and Long, or at best Medium and Long plans and progress.

Costing Projections

Ford SuperDuty F450 Super Ranch 2017 Model

Ford SuperDuty F450 Super Ranch 2017

Current costings on an average run of the mill “dream region” vehicle, not allowing for price increases, inflation and blah, based on “fake” information entered into various comparison sites. So I basically set the years of experience, and pass date back 1 yr and increased NCB by 1 yr each step. The figures are levelled off between 2-3 comparison sites, but don’t allow for cashback or other incentives or my age increasing, which in retrospect I should have increased my age by 1 year as well.

Costing Chart

Year 1: £3,700, 0 NCB, 0 yrs XP.
Year 2: £2,900, 1 NCB, 1 yrs XP.
Year 3: £2,200, 2 NCB, 2 yrs XP.
Year 4: £1,900, 3 NCB, 3 yrs XP. (I have no idea why the drop seems small).
Year 5: £1,2o0, 4 NCB, 4 yrs XP.
Year 6: £1,000, 5 NCB, 5 yrs XP. (again not sure why the drop is small, but seems to be a pattern)
Year 7: £800, 6 NCB, 6 yrs XP.
Year 8: £750, 7 NCB, 7 yrs XP.
Total: £14, 450 over 8 yrs.

From Year 7, the drops are small, about £50 per year and it floats around that same price. Not much difference really, I anticipate, about 10% rise each year on top as well. The medium term price cuts the long term prices down about 40% off the top leaving £8,670, the short term plan, into the medium term plan, into the long term plan gives me about 60% off the long term plan leaving £5,780 over 8yrs. Hefty savings to be had with some shopping around and compromises.

Realistic Plan

I think I’m going to have to find a sub group 6-8 vehicle, which fits my absolute basic needs, which is a little like short term plan 2.0, perhaps a Honda Jazz, Toyota Yaris and at an absolute push Toyota Corolla or an older Gen 8 Civic perhaps, maybe even a Vauxhall Astra. I could make do with a VW Fox, but oddly not a Polo, shoulders are just too wide.

So I think I will have to bite the bullet on an older car for the year, and possible move on again.

What is amusing is, I can get insurance on a 1999 plate, 4 litre, Convertible Chevrolet Camero with a custom reg plate, for LESS than I can on a 1.6 litre Ford Focus, the minimum excess is £3,000 but still, how does that happen. A 4 Litre Red Convertible Sports car costs less than a bloody baby engined Focus ? Its actually cheaper to insure the Camero on a provisional than the Focus too.

Final Thoughts

Unless your 6 n a half feet tall, with huge shoulders and a bit of a gut, the trick is go for an old around 15-16 yrs old, group 3-4 car, like an V/W/X-Reg polo/fiesta, you can get that insured for about £500 on provisional, and about £1,400 first year insurance.

Failing that a 2009 plate Kia Picanto, 2009 Toyota Aygo/C1/107, VW Fox, 2012 Skoda Citigo, will all come in around 600-800 on provisional and 1300-1600 on fill license.

A 2006 Honda Jazz, 2007 Toyota Yaris, 2009 Toyota Corolla, 2010 Vauxhall Astra will all hit 1,000-1,100 on Provision and £2,000-2,200 on full license for the first year.

Its also worth waiting about 3 months after you pass before you get a car. I took a quote on a 2010 Vauxhall Astra Active 1.4L, and assumed I had a provisional, passed that very day, and passed 62 days previous, and passed 125 days ago, and all assumed no named driver experience, and 0 NCB, here’s how it worked out…

Provisional: £1,220
Passed Today: £2,470
Passed 62 Days Ago: £2,200
Passed 125 Days Ago: £2,097

All on the same car, the same is also true on various cars I tried. Once you go above insurance group 15 or below group 4, the differences are way smaller but still apply. But waiting a few months, could save you 8-17% off the top depending which car I tried.

Ford F450 Image Courtesy of Ford Motorcars.

Red Crash Images Courtesy of Duchesssa.

Penile Shrinkage In The Gym

I did debate whether I really wanted go here, but I have since had the discussion with a few other guys and they had noticed but thought nothing of it. They thought perhaps it were cold, the supplements, too tired or some other random thought.

Non-Essential and/or Luxury Tissue Shrinkage is the medical term or Penile Shrinkage. Personally I think the science guys needs to get out more, non-essential ? Luxury I guess depends how far from the floor it hangs.

When you are working out, especially heavy resistance (weights, strongman, etc), circuits and load bearing exercises or activities your muscles swell with blood. This “Pump” as its called, results in muscles holding up to 10 to 20 times more blood than when your sat on the sofa chilling with the latest Lucifer.

You have probably guessed where this is going, in my best grease “where does the pollen go” voice, “Where does the blood go from” ? Well almost any part of your body which isn’t being actively used, starting with luxury tissue, then non-essential tissues, all donate blood, this blood is sent where its needed most by your body.

Less Lunch Box More Snack Box

There are various mechanisms at work here, not only the muscles needing more nutrients and oxygen, but also you’re cortisol levels raising, adrenalin is blocking dopamine, testosterone spikes, growth hormone releases and more. I’ll include a few links at the end for further reading, but its kinda interesting how we are “primed”.

This reduced blood volume can be extreme as making you look almost prepubescent downstairs. If your one of those guys who likes to wear spandex, lycra, cycle shorts and the likes, its time to cut the flirting unless your not really working out to your maximum potential, in which case, GET OUT THE WAY FOOL!.

Otherwise your reputation may not be based on the size of your muscles, athletic prowess but more having a snack box where there should be a lunch box.

The role of adrenalin blocking dopamine, is the same sort of effect you get when using popular fat burners like Stackers and T5s. The precursor of sorts to adrenalin, causes a fight or flight response which in turn murders appetite, primes the body for action and prepares you for intense activity. The more natural effect means that blood can’t pump back until the adrenalin effect is overcome and dopamine becomes dominant. This means it doesn’t matter if a smoking hottie decides directly in front of you, is The Place to do her squats and bent over rows there shall be no wind in the sail… I’m talking about you EF Blondie 😉

Further Reading

This article explains why your muscles need more blood during exercise, worth a read to understand the process.

This article covers mostly stress and depression along with penile shrinkage is interesting since many of those factors associated with heavy gym work apply. Such as cortisol, nitric oxide and testosterone production, I suspect training triggers some of those same processes and has the same effect.

Ultimate Guide to Storing Fresh Produce

Black Banana left in Fridge

Black Banana left in Fridge via WikiPedia.

I have to admit, I’m not great at eating fresh vegetables, more so than I am at fruit. Getting the vegetables in isn’t usually too bad as I keep an array of frozen veg in the chiller, and various microwavable vegetables in the fridge.

Knowing what to store, where, isn’t always easy. We’ve all made the mistake of putting a banana in to the fridge and seen what happens (look left). Often the banana in fine on the inside but the skin doesn’t look great.

Some produce loves the fridge, Others love the sunlight, others just fine on the counter top. The odd one needs a little prep like a brocolli with a spray of water or avacado with a little oil.

I came across this chart a week or so ago by MyFitnessPal and honestly, I think its amazing.

My love of printing Cheat Sheets is already established, I think this one is being added to the fridge door to remind me.

The article also covers some other tips, such as paper bagging fruit with certain apples so speed up the ripening process, so check out the article as well as the infographic.

All-in-One Guide to Storing Fresh Produce by MyFitnessPal

All-in-One Guide to Storing Fresh Produce by MyFitnessPal

Infographic by MyFitnessPal.

Building A Domain Drop List

Well here comes part 2, of the guide. What Do You Need is Part 1 which details the requirements, application process, etc. This article assumes you have Nominet Membership, EPP, DAC and Zonefile Access along with suitable hosting.

Drop List Building Applications

You could do this in 1 large application to handle it all, but I think that’s a mistake. Writing a collection of small tools each with a simple job, reduces server load and risk of timing out. Not to mention makes it easier to handle.

So first things first…

A Simple Database

You will need a simple database to hold the list and dates…

id(int), domain(varchar(136)), dropdate(timestamp), updated(timestamp) on update).

How simple is that database… I haven’t posted a database schema, since you may want to add Tag, Creation Date, Expiry Date, even break it down to show Keywords or Extensions, or anything else you require really. You could also include things like domain length, if it exists in other .UK family extensions and much more, so I have just given you the absolute basic.

I would personally include the domain length, the second level family extension, and possibly creation year.

Loading The List

The first small application is one which can read the 10.5 million names in the CSV and load these into the database. The odds are a shared hosting account wouldn’t be able to handle this kind of long resource hungry process, hence why you’ll need Suitable VPS hosting or similar.

This application is as simple as…

This can take anywhere up to half hour I would guess, depending on the power of your server and available memory.

In order to add domain lenth, you would need to have added a length column to the database earlier. Once that’s done either with the MySQL command char_length() or the php command length(). The easiest would be…

You could just as easily do…

You’re choice entirely, adding the extension would work the same way.

Obtaining The Drop Dates

When the domain names are loaded into the database, you will need another small application to read them one by one or in clusters, poll them with the Nominet DAC, and populate the database with the returned data. Since I posted a Dac Query Snippet already, I’ll just link to that, and you can add in the MySQL and the loop yourself.

You could use something like

I have selected the limit of 1400, this will take approximately 5 minutes at 200ms / 5x per second allowing for latency. A simple CRONJOB set to load the script every 5 minutes and you’re golden. You can do smaller or greater amounts but it will eat memory and resources potentially making the server sluggish. Experiment a little but remember to adjust your CRON and bear in mind the DAC limitations.

Assuming you have used my DAC Query Code and added the extra bits. You will need to use an SQL Query to extrapolate the dropdate from expiry date which is returned by the DAC. I’m going to assume you have moved the expiry into a variable, but you can work on the array value too.

The above query updates the dropdate, where the domain matches, and adds 92 days on to the returned expiry date to create the expected drop date. You can add any other data you want based on the DAC output by adding to this query as you wish.

DAC Limitations and Rules

Now would be a good time to discus the Rules and Limitations of the Domain Availability Checker (DAC), the DAC Usage Instructions are here too.. You are limited to polling 432,000 queries per day, with a maximum of 16 names per second (1,000 per rolling minute). By queries that means ‘#limits’ or ‘#usage’ or actual domains they all count. Go over either of these limits and you will be blocked from DAC access until your quota recovers on a rolling 24 hour basis.

IF you do happen to hit a block, then the DAC will return a result like…

A simple if…then trap, will be able to detect this and convert it from the number of seconds (35065) into a human readable time frame, I used to use this old code snippet.

Well that’s your drop list, built and populated with a little expense, a chunk of time and some basic coding, much of it done for you.

Depending on the efficiency of your code, server latency and some other factors, it could take up to 26 days scan the whole zone file, by this point your database would be up to 4 weeks out of date. This is because the zone file is 24 hours old when released. Part 3: Maintaining A Drop List, we will deal with this problem and work on updating the database.

Driving Theory Test

A week ago I finally got around to sorting my Theory and Hazard Perception Test, this may shock some since I own cars and number plates with plans to buy more, yet I don’t actually drive. I always joke, why drive when you can be driven ;).

DVLA Trainng Apps

DVLA Trainng Apps

In the middle of August around my birthday, there were an argument or “debate” on Facebook about some minor highway code rule. The original poster said “those who break it shouldn’t have a license”. I checked the highway code before I said anything, and they were wrong. They decided they have been driving since Moses partied with the Hebrews in Gomorrah and they were right, I were wrong. Their reasoning “Because out there in the jungle, I mean on the road its different”. Who shouldn’t have the license really?, perhaps those who think the rules no longer apply to them.

A day or two after that, the 22nd August to be exact, I download the highway code app and various driving apps. I read the highway code, played the different types of quiz and apps. I decided, this is easy, I know this stuff.

On 27th August I booked my Theory and Hazard Perception test for first thing in the morning in just over 2 weeks time. I started to read a dozen different road acts and laws, the official highway code website and anything else that I could find. The day before the test started watching The Strain, I ended up awake until 4am, and had to wake up at 7am to get showered and ready for the test. Powered by Grenade Hydra-6 Chocolate Charge and Gatorade Orange I headed out just before 9am for the test at 10:30am.

The Test Centre

You should arrive around 30 minutes early, this is to allow for queues, check in, and you have some stuff you have to read before hand. As soon as you enter the test centre, even in the waiting area, you must turn your phone off. Not on silent, not aeroplane mode, OFF! failure to do, is a refusal to allow you to do your test.

You queue up, and its important you stand behind the Queue Here stand, otherwise you are told to step back and look a tool which I witnessed several times. Once you have queued up, they ask you for your drivers license, to confirm some details and book you in.

If you have any special requirements, you have to let them know here and they can make provisions. Such as voice overs, larger print, medications, etc.


After booking in, they give you a locker key with essentially a brick attached (looks more like an Anne Summers Special) and some information you have to read and agree too. In the locker you have to lock hats, coats, drinks, food, phones, wallets, jackets, fleeces, keys, pens, paper, pretty much anything. This is all on the stuff they give you to read along with other rules and guidelines, 3 pages in total.

The only things you are permitted to take on to the “killing floor” or test booths are suitable clothing, your drivers license and the locker key and brick.

The Test Booths

Theory Test Booths

Theory Test Booths

The room at my test centre were a small is room, with squared semi-circle like a [ shape, with 8 or 9 wooden office dividers, making small booths. There were an observation area behind where the inspector guy sits where he can see all the booths. He explains if there are any problems, raise your hand he’ll come over to you.

Inside each booth were a computer case, a mouse, a keyboard and a white square the size of a mouse mat which says “place your belongings here”. This is where the locker key with the huge stick attached to it, and your drivers license are to be placed. Over head is a CCTV Camera on each booth to watch you’re not cheating and such, and to the left a pair of headphones hung on the divider.

Adjust the seat, and the screen make sure you have a good view, as moving it during the test makes them suspicious. I also suggest adjusting the headphones to fit as you’ll need them later on. You have been logged in by the inspector guy who is behind you, so you just need to click start.

The Actual Test

The test is broken up into various parts, each part has a set time limit, and various controls and options. You are given some choices as well, some you don’t have to do, some you do have to do.

Learning Mode

Initially you are given a system run through over how the system works. Where it asks you to select, and deselect things, change options and such like. I guess this is mostly to test everything works and make sure you can use it.

This is timed at 5:00 minutes.

Practice Mode

You are then given the option of doing a “practice session” which is really just a more in-depth version of the above. In this you are asked to select options, flag options for later review if you are unsure. Explained exactly how it all works, what each option on the menus do, etc.

This works exactly like the real test only it only has about a dozen pages / questions. Its well worth doing this, so you know how to flag and review, I used this feature myself.

This is timed at 15:00 minutes.

Break Time

You are given a short period of time to prepare and relax before you perform the on screen instructions to start the test. You cannot move from your booth at this time and should remain looking forward.

This is timed at 2:00 minutes.

Multiple Choice Theory Test

This is 50 questions, and 43 questions are required to be correct in order to pass. Approx 44 of my questions were general highway code questions. Stopping distances, road signs, vehicle marks, first aid, traffic lights etc, mostly basics.

Towards the end were a “case study”, it gives you approx 6-7 sentences about a fictional journey, for example it may say…

You are moving house, so you get a roof rack fitted to your car and load it up with your belongings. 

You travel down a 3 lane motorway for most of the journey. On this journey you notice a sign with “40” on it over the hard shoulder.

The motorway is quite congested so you move from the left lane to the right lane to overtake slow moving vehicles before moving back to the left lane. 

You notice a warning sign saying “Fog Ahead”, shortly after you find yourself in the fog, but it clears up in a few miles. 

Some of your belongings fall off the roof rack in the left hand lane. After dealing with this incident, you leave the motorway. 

You want to go ahead and take the 3nd exit of 5 on the round about.

Theory Test Results Screen

Theory Test Results Screen

It then asked a series of multiple choice questions based on the above description, one of them were like, “while you were overtaking, what colour were the reflective studs on your right”, “What did you do when you saw the fog sign”, stuff like that.

One question answer troubled me, which is related to the left hand lane. Its not clear if round about is on the slip road, nor how many lanes the round about has. It then asks you “which lane would you go in”, with the answers “left, right, middle or most appropriate“, there are other questions like this which are in my opinion are tricky.

This kind of threw me off guard as I hadn’t seen this before in any of the apps or literature I read.

At the end you are told how many incomplete, flagged and answers questions there are on the review screen. You have the option to review the unanswered, the flagged, the answered or indeed the entire test before you hit end test and confirm it.

This is timed at 57:00 minutes.

Break Time Part Deux

You are given anther short break after the Multiple Choice Test, to relax a little bit and prepare for the theory test. You cannot move from your booth during this break.

This is timed at 3:00 mintues.

Hazard Perception Test

Much like the multiple choice section, this is broken into 2 parts. A demo or introduction mode, which talks you through it and shows you step by step how it works.

Followed by the actual test being administered.

Introduction Mode

At the start of the test you are advised to put your headphones on, to listen to the introduction. The introduction shows you a demo video and explains how the clicking works. It explains you should click on developing hazards as soon as you see them develop, and as they are happening. It explains about clicking too fast or too many times, or in any sort of pattern, and you’ll score 0 for that clip.

What I din’t know is, you don’t have to click the mouse where the hazard as is happening, just as soon as you see it developing. You can’t actually see the mouse cursor on the screen unlike in the multiple choice where you can.

After this, it shows the same video click again, and explains the various potential hazards, and shows you how the scoring of 5-1 points would work on that clip when the actual hazard develops and explains the whole clip.

It also tells you, if you click the hazard on 5, then again on 3 and again too late, the computer counts your first click, so you will still score a full 5 for that hazard.

You can watch this twice if you are unsure or the volume were low etc. You don’t need the headphones after this.

This is timed at 5:00 minutes.

The Actual Test

The test is 14 Computer Generated Videos, each lasting 60 seconds (ish) with a 10 second break between each one. Do NOT click the mouse during the 10 second countdown as it can register those clicks and result in a 0 score penalty.

One of the videos has 2 hazards, the other 13 have only 1 hazard.

Each hazard you spot, depending on how early you catch it developing is worth up to 5 points. You need a minimum of 44 points to pass, this is out of a possible 75 points.

What I did is click each potential hazard as soon as I saw it, then clicked again if and when it developed. This didn’t trigger any penalties, and seemed acceptable.

This is timed at 15:00 minutes.

Potential Questions

At the end it may or may not ask you about some potential future questions, you were asked before the test started if you were interested in these. These don’t affect your test score at all. These are questions which they are considering adding to the multiple choice or hazard tests in future.

For me this were about 5 multiple choice questions, which seemed to be more like “word play” on existing questions. For example in the theory test, I were asked:

What is the stopping distance when travelling at 50mph ?

in the potential future questions I were asked:

What is the stopping distance on a clear, dry road while travelling at 50mph?

This may mean there is also a “What is the stopping distance on a wet road at 50mph?” question in the bank, somewhere or maybe its just wordplay to make you question it.

Customer Satisfaction

Lastly you are asked about a dozen questions, everything from how long did it take to get your provisional license, if you booked online how happy are you with the service, were you happy with the way the system worked etc.

One question threw me a little “What is your ethnicity, this is so we can ensure the test is administered fairly”, how exactly is knowing if I’m black, white or polkadot going to change how the test is administered ?

My Test Results

I scored 49 correct multiple choice out of 50  (98%), and 67 hazard points out of 75 (90%), giving me 94% total score. So I got a pretty good pass, a very good pass for some ones first test, and apparently astonishing for someone who has never had a professional driving lesson in their life.

What You Need to Build A Domain Drop List

Nomient Logo

Nomient Logo

This article is going to be a 4 part jobby, with a few side articles possibly, as it turned out to be somewhat longer than I expected. Most people reading this blog will know what a drop list is, but you may not know how to make one or how much effort and expense goes into it. Currently a lot less effort goes into since Nominet released the zone files. The old way will be one of the side articles I cover another time.

What is a drop list is quite a simple question; a list of domains due to expire on any given day. I’m going to talk about what you need to build one in this post, and in the next one how you build your own drop list and the costs you will likely incur in both parts. After that it will be an article on maintaining the drop list and buying drop lists in the final part. Some of the methods are hard earned lessons, which will save you time. I won’t be giving all my secrets away, some will be old methods, so there are better ways to do it, but they still work. I will also be dropping in some chunks of code too, the missing bits will be easy enough with basic coding skills which I assume you have.

Where To Start ?

Building your own drop list, isn’t too hard. It is however quite costly and time consuming, not to mention fraught with rules from Nominet. The rules are somewhat open to interpretation so I’m not going to go there, better to speak to Nominet directly about them.

Nominet Membership

Firstly a Nominet Tag is required, which is FREE, however this isn’t enough, a Nominet Membership is required. This membership costs £400+Vat to Join, then £100+Vat per year membership.

You will also need DAC Access which is £25+VAT per year, that’s the last of the Nominet costs, but not the end.

A list of Fee’s are available here… Nominet Fee Schedule, you can see the main benefit here is the cost of domains at wholesale prices, but direct access to Nominet systems is essential for list building and drop catching.

Suitable Hosting

Suitable hosting is quite subjective, but I would recommend a VPS Hosting Account. This is because shared hosting almost certainly won’t be suitable. You’ll hit your resource limits and get an get somewhat unhappy email from your host, if not asking you to upgrade or sling your hook.

A suitable VPS will cost you anywhere from £10-30 per month. This is assuming you are comfortable and able to manage a Linux Server and install PHP, MySQL, Apache and manage the required security updates yourself. Otherwise a Managed VPS will be possibly £30-80+ per month, do your own research and choose wisely.

An important factor here to remember is, unlike with Drop Catching where the speed between your server and Nominet is Critical, in this instance it doesn’t matter at all, so cheap with a decent reputation and good support is your objective.

Alternatives to VPS and Shared Hosting

I have heard of people doing this on a business hosting account, which is often half way between a low end VPS and a standard shared account or more simply a shared hosting account with more resources.

There are also a number of people who have claim they used an install of WAMP (Windows, Apache, MySQL and PHP 0r MAMP (Mac, Apache, MySQL an PHP) on a local machine, machine on their network or even on their own PC.

You could also build such a thing on a local NAS Server like a Synology NAS Server or qNAP or any other for that matter. I personally have a test environment on one of my Synology units and see no reason most 2-Bay units wouldn’t be able to handle a project of this size.

These routes are worth looking in to, but I can’t comment on any of them with regards to efficacy, as I haven’t done them.

Apply for Zone File Access

Once you’re 1, a Nominet Member with DAC Access, 2, have your hosting sorted, you need apply to Nominet for Zone File access. You have to be a Nominet Member to gain access to this. When you’ve been granted Zone File access, you need to download and process the file. I blogged on the .UK Zone File Release, to give you an idea of the process.

Nominet Zonefile Zip File Content

Nominet Zonefile Zip File Content

The file you will download is around 240mb; a zip file which contains 9 unique files inside (see right). These are individual Zone File for each available extension under the .UK ccTLD, all managed by Nominet. Exacting them all will consume just over 1.5GB of storage, more or less depending on destination disk format.

Even though there are 9 files in the archive there are only 2 types of file.

1, Zone Files, these contain details about the zone, along with domains and their name servers. We won’t be using these, for drop lists we don’t need name servers.

2, Database Dump, which is a Comma Separated Value (CSV) file.

The CSV file is a literally just a list of domains, with nothing in there which makes it very very easy to process and quite fast. It will look like the list below…

Its important to note, neither the individual zone files, or the database dump contain any dates, tags or anything more other than domain names or domain names, zone data and name servers.

In Part 2, I will discuss bringing the above together to actually build a drop list.

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